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会议名称:  1759: An Interdisciplinary Conference
会议时间:  2009-04-15
会议地点:  Belfast, United Kingdom
会议主题:   2009 sees the 250th anniversary of the events and publications of 1759, a crucial moment in British and global history culture and ideas. To mark the occasion, the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies at Queen’s University Belfast will be hosting an interdisciplinary conference on the theme of 1759. The conference will present an opportunity for discussion and critical assessment of a year that, according to Frank McLynn, should be ‘as well known in British history as 1066’.
会议内容:  

1759: An Interdisciplinary Conference
Keynote Speakers: Professor Thomas Keymer (University of Toronto)
     Professor Nicholas Rogers (York University, Toronto) 
 
 2009 sees the 250th anniversary of the events and publications of 1759, a crucial moment in British and global history
culture and ideas. To mark the occasion, the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies at Queen’s University Belfast will be
hosting an interdisciplinary conference on the theme of 1759. The conference will present an opportunity for discussion and
critical assessment of a year that, according to Frank McLynn, should be ‘as well known in British history as 1066’.
In the international realm, 1759 represented the turning point in the Seven Years’ War and a watershed moment in
Britain’s drive for colonial dominance over France, with British military and naval victories making national heroes of men
such as Pitt the Elder, General Wolfe and (to a lesser extent) Admiral Hawke. In literature, 1759 also saw the publication of
3 canonical novels of ideas: Voltaire’s Candide, Samuel Johnson’s The Prince of Abissinia (later Rasselas), and the first two
volumes of Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. In the arenas of moral philosophy and aesthetic theory, Adam Smith
outlined a rational model of sympathy in the first edition of  The Theory of Moral Sentiments, while Edward Young
published his Conjectures on Original Composition, Alexander Gerard an Essay on Taste, and Edmund Burke the second
edition of A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origins of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, with its important new
introduction on ‘taste’. Elsewhere in culture and commerce, 1759 also saw the opening to the public of the British Museum
John  Harrison’s  completion  of  chronometer  Number  4  (the  eventual  Board  of  Longitude  prize-winner);  the  forma
suppression of the Encyclopédie; the deaths of Handel and William Collins; and the founding in Dublin of the St James
brewery, by Arthur Guinness.

The  1759  conference  will  enable  discussion  of  all  of  these  topics  and  anniversaries,  and  of  the  possible
relationships between them. As we shall ask: if 1759 was a key year not just in political and military terms but also in
literature, culture and thought, what are the links between these events and achievements, and how can we account –
historically, culturally and theoretically – for their concurrence at this specific moment? More broadly, we shall hope to
explore the 1750s as an understudied decade in the field of culture (as for instance in the history of the novel), and the
national and political repercussions of the events of 1759, both within the Seven Years’ War and beyond (for instance in
Ireland and in relation to Jacobitism). In the spirit of the period itself, the conference will also encourage more general
enquiry into the relationships between history, literature, philosophy and culture, along with self-reflexive debate about the
academic ‘anniversary’ industry and the merits, and limitations, of focusing on a single year in history. 
 

Possible topics
Papers and panels might address the following topics:
 
  The international / global significance of 1759
  Understandings of ‘empire’ at this time
  The experience of war in Britain, France, Europe, India, and the Americas
  The European theatre and/vs the ‘French and Indian War’
  Maritime power; invasion threats and scares; engagements at sea
  Reassessing the key figures and events of the 7 Years’ War
  The making – and debunking – of political and military reputations
  Neglected figures – and victims – of the 7 Years’ War
  Women and the 7 Years’ War
  1759 in/and Ireland
 
  Historicizing Candide
  The place of Candide in the career and reputation of Voltaire
  Rasselas and/against historicist criticism
  Rasselas and the ‘rise of the novel’
  Tristram Shandy – esp. volumes 1 & 2
  The importance of 1759 in Sterne’s literary career
  The philosophical novel, or ‘novel of ideas’
  The literary culture of the (late) 1750s
 
  The first edition of Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments, and its relation to later editions
  Ideas about ‘sympathy’, pre- and post-Smith
  Young’s Conjectures on Original Composition
  New ideas about ‘originality’ at this time
  The notion of ‘taste’ in 1759
  1759 and Enlightenment / ‘modernity’
  Ideals of rationality and citizenship, in 1759 and the present
 
  Culture and commerce: the opening of the British Museum; the completion of chronometer Number 4; the
founding of St James’ brewery
  Anniversary papers re: key deaths: Handel; Collins; Maupertuis
  Other historical events: eg the accession to the Spanish throne of Charles III; the assassination of the Mughal
emperor, Alamgir II; the ending of the Jacobite threat
  Other publications: eg Robertson’s History of Scotland; Goldsmith’s The Bee and An Enquiry into the
Present State of Polite Learning in Europe; Sterne’s A Political Romance; Sarah Fielding’s The History of
the Countess of Dellwyn; The Histories of Some of the Penitents in the Magdalen House.
  Theatrical performances: Garrick, Harlequin’s Invasion; Macklin, Love à la Mode; Goldoni, Gl’Innamorati.
  The year in newspapers / journals (eg the Annual Register, Gentleman’s Magazine, etc.)
  Other texts written in 1759, or that refer back to 1759: letters; (auto)biographies; etc.
  Anniversary papers re: important figures born this year (with reference to 1759 specifically): William
Wilberforce; Pitt the Younger; Mary Wollstonecraft; Friedrich Schiller; Robert Burns; Georges Danton;
Dean Mahomed
 
  More general examination of the relationships between the following: history, literature, philosophy, politics,
empire, ‘ideas’, culture
  Academic ‘anniversary’ culture
  The uses, and limits, of single-year case studies
 

主办单位:  Queen's University Belfast
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